The California Native Plant Society is essentially the only organization in California dedicated to the conservation of California native flora. The California Native Plant Society is recognized for its expertise in native plants, and is generally seen as credible in positions and actions that are clearly related to native plants. We lose credibility when others perceive us as taking a position on an issue unrelated to native plants. To preserve our credibility and effectiveness, we must stick to issues connected to our Mission regarding the conservation of native plants and their habitats. If that connection is not apparent in a given case, we must make it very clear in our positions, statements, and actions, and support that with scientific information.

Facing Threats to Native Plants with Advocacy

In the face of increasing threats, advocacy for native plants, for native plant habitats, and for native plants as parts of larger ecosystems is absolutely necessary. Threats may be direct and obvious, such as removal of plant populations for development, or may be indirect, in issues such as fuel management, weed invasions, decreased water availability, degraded air, water, or soil quality, and climate change. When threats are indirect, CNPS advocates must clearly establish a connection with native-plant conservation. We cannot use such indirect or theoretical connections to justify activities harmful or destructive to native plants and vegetation.

Doing Science-Based Advocacy

Through the state staff, the state programs, and the state-wide network of Chapters, California Native Plant Society provides and supports the best and most up-to-date information and research on California’s native plants, native plant habitats and native plants as parts of larger ecosystems. Making clear the effects of our actions on the conservation of native plants and their habitats is essential to maximizing the value of that science-based advocacy.

Our Mission

To conserve California native plants and their natural habitats, and increase understanding, appreciation, and horticultural use of native plants.